A Bit of Support

I have a confession to make. I have had a bit of support. No, it’s not a girdle, nor a truss. Obviously I don’t need those. I’m surprised your mind went to such things.

The support I am talking about, came from Advent Advocacy. Specifically, Joanne, I can actually give you her real name, whoopee. I feel like I should make one up, just for fun. I’ve gotten so use to having to make up names.

JoJo, sorry, Joanne has been incredible. Let me just start up my Thesaurus. Otherwise, I’m gonna get boring saying how brilliant and fantastic she is.

We needed help with a care related issue and Joanne was awesome. Glad I started up the Thesaurus. She visited us at home and after spending time getting to know us and our situation, understood what would help. She is empathetic, caring and knowledgeable. The most amazing thing is that she doesn’t even cover Hartlepool. The request for advocacy help was accidentally sent to her (not by us, I hasten to add). She saw that we had been waiting for support for weeks and stepped in to help. Going above and beyond her normal remit, is just one thing that makes her stand out.

Superwoman, oh I forgot I can use her real name. We first met Joanne at a time when we didn’t know which way was up. Having turned my wheelchair the right way up. Why do feel the need to explain that is a joke? Oh yes, because we live in an age where some people think the earth is flat.

Joanne has a way about her that cuts through the… rubbish and helped us see the issues. I will not go into the details, that isn’t the point of this blog. She transformed the situation. Her knowledge and skill were essential. But it comes with understanding, empathy and compassion. At the end of the day, you can train someone with knowledge. Only character brings the rest.

Mary and I want to wholeheartedly thank Joanne. It is a heartfelt thanks and we know that she must be a blessing to many.

A Special Thanks

‘A special thanks goes to…’

I feel like one of those award show hosts. But without the false tan, bleached teeth and the big hair. Well without much hair at all really. Let’s not talk about teeth. Back to the thanks:

‘A special thanks goes to….’

 ‘The award for the best… goes to…’

Hey, maybe I should be an awards host. I’m a natural. I can just see me up front, in a big Hollywood venue. Will they have a ramp for the wheelchair? Or would I need to present from in front of the audience, just by the orchestra pit? I know, will start off with:

‘Welcome to the 2022 awards for the best…’

Everyone will be looking around asking, ‘who’s that speaking?’

‘Where is that deep and luscious voice coming from?’

‘Is that James Earl Jones’

‘No, don’t be silly, it’s Morgan Freeman.’

Anyway, enough of the asides. I am writing this blog as a big thank you. A very big thank you. A special thanks to the two social workers from Hartlepool Borough Council, who have helped Mary and I these last few months. I would love to name them, but I am told I can’t and besides, they know who they are. Thank you El and Karla, oops, no, just made those names up.

The two of them have helped us sort out care provision at a really difficult time. They have demonstrated empathy, understanding, care and patience. I cannot praise them highly enough. Anyone who has read my blogs regularly will know that I believe people who care for people are the most valuable people in the world. Does that remind you of a Barbara Streisand song? ‘People who need people, are the…’ Totally different meaning of course. But give me the whiff of a song and I’m off.

Back to these two amazing and wonderful social workers. Along with all those who care for and help others. We had a brilliant advocate as well. Not Advocaat that’s a cream liqueur. They should be recognised as the best and paid the most. People who care for people, not cream liqueurs. Instead, we as a country and indeed, the world recognises them least. We value money, fame and entertainment over those who care for people. What an upside-down world we live in.

I know this, when an MP, banker, millionaire financier or the PM is ill. They won’t be calling on their brokers, personal assistants or advisors to care for them. However highly they pay them. They will turn to health workers, carers and those at the sharp end of care. I am pleased to say that when we have needed to do that, we have found help and support.

As I round off my awards ceremony, I repeat my special thanks to these two wonderful social workers from Hartlepool Borough Council. Well done you are brilliant people, and we really value you. Everyone who can stand, up on your feet for a rousing applause.

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Habinteg Post

Our policy work is central to our strategy to improve housing options for disabled & older people. 👉 https://lnkd.in/dCwhAQvw

As part of that work we produce evidence – like our Forecast for Accessible Homes – to influence policy & support best practice in accessible housing.

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My Article Published

Inside Housing have published my article/blog Enabled by your environment. It has triggered interest from a national newspaper. They wrote the headline.

https://www.insidehousing.co.uk/comment/comment/i-had-to-move-to-the-north-east-to-get-an-accessible-home-we-need-to-provide-more-housing-for-people-with-disabilities-76113

You can register free to read the full article.

Wheelchair Etiquette

Well, anyone who knows me, will realise that I am 100% serious. I never have my tongue in my cheek, nor write farcical blogs. Now we’ve established that. Let me outline an important issue that has come to my attention. I was reading on a wheelie site about how to greet a fellow wheelie when out and about.

Now this is an issue that has given me must angst. I never know what’s right. For anyone who is not a wheelchair user, picture the scene. You are out in your wheelchair. You may be in a powered wheelchair. Or being pushed. You may even be self-propelling. Hold on, the motive force is irrelevant. Then you see a wheelchair coming the other way. What do you do? In between feeling awkward and panicking that is.

If you were on your feet and walking along. You could do what most people in that situation do. Pretend your eye level is too high to notice the wheelchair. We are literally out of your sightline. Job done; embarrassing situation averted. No need to think of a suitable reaction. Well, I can’t do that. Even if I wanted to. I am looking straight at the oncoming stranger. They just happen to also be in a wheelchair. Is that some kind of kinship? An automatic bond. A fellowship of the wheel? All friends together. United in our common limitations? How do I react? What do I say?

So, a wheelchair is heading towards me. I needed to repeat that as it was so long ago I last mentioned it. Who is in it? Does it matter anyway? If it was a famous person, or Royalty. The Queen has a fancy golf cart now. So, it could be her, out for a spin in another new bit of equipment. Maybe it’s someone I know. Scrub that. I don’t know anyone local to me in a wheelchair. A stranger is wheeling towards me at speed. Actually, that’s unlikely. They are probably wheeling towards me slowly. I have lots of time to consider my actions. Oh, the angst.

Have you got the scene in your mind? Let me mess that up and add some extra detail. The most likely time I might meet a fellow wheelie is on a wide and straight promenade. As in alongside a beach. Now you are all in the South of France or Spain, sun beating down. Cool off a bit. This is the Northeast of England.

Back to reality. I am wheeling slowly towards a fellow wheelie along the promenade. This is sounding like a Hollywood movie. You’re picturing a romantic moment of meeting. The music swelling. But that is not the right image at all. I am approaching a complete stranger. Unless it is the Queen. I feel like I know her. She’s on my stamps and money. No, its not the queen. Let’s not be silly.

Do I smile, pull a face, ignore them, frown, scowl, say something? Hang on a second, who said that? I am British and an introvert to boot. Maybe there is a secret greeting for two wheelchair users. Are we like the Masons? Do we have a coded wheel bump, or twirl of the chairs that we are meant to do? Is there just a double right eyed wink? That could be tricky if you get it wrong. Just imagine you all take me literally and start doing that. I really need to know what to do.

Answers on a postcard to, ‘WheelsUp, Confused Row, Bea MY M8

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Above and Beyond

There are times when people do things that are above and beyond. They go out of their way to help you. Yesterday, Kelly from Persimmon Customer Care did just that.

If you read my blogs regularly, you’ll know I spend most of my time in a hospital type bed. What you may not know is its position. Right next to a double window. Late the night before last, the little plastic button that enables it to latch/open/close, broke. As our house is still under warranty, I emailed Kelly at Persimmon asking if she could arrange for it to be fixed. I explained that it was the one by my bed and that I am in that bed most of the time. The weather has been very variable. As wind/rain can blow straight in and onto my bed, it needs to be able to close. But it also needs to be able to open on these hot days.

I got an email from Kelly pretty early yesterday morning to say that she had contacted BPS (the window supplier/manufacturer/fitter) asking them to fix it. That’s the proper procedure in this case. I got a text from BPS about 20 mins later saying they would be out in 21 days to repair it!!

I phoned BPS and explained that it was the window by my bed, and I am disabled, and all the above about weather. Two hours later I got another text from BPS with an improved timescale, 14 days!!

I emailed Kelly back and told her all this and asked if anyone from Persimmon could help more quickly. She phoned me back within the hour. Kelly told me she’d organised for one of their customer care operatives, Ross, to come round that afternoon and fix it. When I thanked her, she said, that she couldn’t leave me by a window that doesn’t shut. Ross turned up about 3pm and replaced the handle. I realise that is above and beyond what they had to do. Persimmon could have left it to BPS. But Kelly recognised that it was a very real issue for me. She personally found a way to sort it very fast. I cannot commend her highly enough for that. Hence writing this blog, just to highlight what she did.

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